Category: LinkedIn

Big, huge, massive, surprising social media trends

surprising social media trends

Each year I enjoy digging into the Infinite Dial report, the longest-running social media study that is conducted by Edison Research. I always find a few surprising social media trends that raise an eyebrow and this year was no different.

It’s a Marketing Companion tradition to explore some of the big ideas from this research report and on the newest show, Brooke Sellas and I explore questions like:surprising social media trends 2

  • Why Facebook is seeing a rise in teen usage.
  • Why podcast listening us up, but the average number of shows consumed is down.
  • Why Pinterest is in an apparent nose-dive.
  • How the idea that older folks are taking over TikTok is a myth.
  • Why the war on smart speakers will have long-ranging eCommerce consequences.

Oh my gosh, this is a juicy episode. If you’re a social media geek like me, this will be your best content of the week. Enjoy!

PS Could this be the best Marketing Companion intro ever?

Click on this link to listen to Episode 186

Other ways to enjoy our podcast

Please support our extraordinary sponsors. Our content is free because of their generosity.

Many thanks to our friend Scott Monty for the awesome show intro. Be sure to check out his amazing newsletter The Full Monty and his new podcast available here: fullmontyshow.com.

Tim Washer is contributing creative direction to the show and he’s has worked for Conan O’Brien, John Oliver, among others. He helps corporations build more creative cultures.

It’s hard to ignore — millions of business professionals are active on LinkedIn. They have twice the buying power of a normal web user. If you’re in business, you need to be exploring advertising on LinkedIn. Brooke and I have both had tremendous success with this marketing platform and to help you get started, LinkedIn is offering Marketing Companion listeners $100 in free ad credit. That can go a LONG WAY! Take advantage of this opportunity today by visiting linkedin.com/companion

RSM Marketing provides an indispensable outsourced marketing department! Why struggle with turnover and staffing when RSM clients receive a marketing director and all the resources they need under a flat fee monthly subscription?

RSM employs dozens of specialists and experienced marketing directors who assist companies ranging from startups to market leaders with thousands of employees. Companies across the country from all categories are choosing this model to overcome marketing complexity and outpace their competition. The typical outsourcing client uses 11 RSM subject matter specialists but pays less than the cost of one of their own employees. RSM provides breakthrough marketing for clients and has been named twice to the INC 5000 list. Visit RSM for special Marketing Companion offers including $5,000 in free services.

The post Big, huge, massive, surprising social media trends appeared first on Schaefer Marketing Solutions: We Help Businesses {grow}.

Everything is out of date because the world is new

world is new

It has been interesting to observe how SLOOOOOOW the corporate world has been to respond to the coronavirus crisis.

Most of this is understandable. It take months to plan, create, and schedule advertising for these big brands. But a lot of what is being published right now is so out of sync with the needs of the world right now.

How will the biggest brands pivot and when?

This is a preamble to sheepishly explain this week’s podcast episode.

This edition of The Marketing Companion was recorded on March 9, 2020. It is a SUPER FUN episode but one of the things Brooke Sellas and I discussed was an experiential promotion based on the NCAA March Madness tournament, one of the most popular sporting events in America (maybe my favorite!)

The episode went live exactly one week later — and by then the NCAA tournament had been canceled — as had the baseball season, the Kentucky Derby, and every other sporting event and concert in America.

One week.

Between us, Brooke and I have more than 50 years of business experience. We have seen a lot, we have done a lot. And yet we blew it. We couldn’t see one week in front of us.

But who can right now? An interesting lesson in unprecedented times.

So … this week’s episode is a little on the weird side. But it is still AWESOME.

First, I talk about the recent Social Media Marketing World conference and something really weird that happened to me out there.

Hey. You’re locked in and working from home. Put on the headphones. Tune to a movie for the kids and enjoy the show:

Click on this link to listen to Episode 184

Other ways to enjoy our podcast

Please support our extraordinary sponsors. Our content is free because of their generosity.

It’s hard to ignore — millions of business professionals are active on LinkedIn. They have twice the buying power of a normal web user. If you’re in business, you need to be exploring advertising on LinkedIn. Brooke and I have both had tremendous success with this marketing platform and to help you get started, LinkedIn is offering Marketing Companion listeners $100 in free ad credit. That can go a LONG WAY! Take advantage of this opportunity today by visiting linkedin.com/companion

RSM Marketing provides an indispensable outsourced marketing department! Why struggle with turnover and staffing when RSM clients receive a marketing director and all the resources they need under a flat fee monthly subscription?

RSM employs dozens of specialists and experienced marketing directors who assist companies ranging from startups to market leaders with thousands of employees. Companies across the country from all categories are choosing this model to overcome marketing complexity and outpace their competition. The typical outsourcing client uses 11 RSM subject matter specialists but pays less than the cost of one of their own employees. RSM provides breakthrough marketing for clients and has been named twice to the INC 5000 list. Visit RSM for special Marketing Companion offers including $5,000 in free services.

The post Everything is out of date because the world is new appeared first on Schaefer Marketing Solutions: We Help Businesses {grow}.

Need new power for your content marketing? Add a celebrity hologram!

 

celebrity hologram

The Whitney Houston celebrity hologram

An article in the New York Times made my head spin.

The piece chronicled a comeback tour for the iconic 1970s rock band Dio. The band filled arenas as the popular frontman Ronny James Dio paced around the stage. But there is a twist. The singer has been dead for 10 years.

The concert marked a milestone in the use of computer-generated holograms in big-time entertainment venues and fans at sold-out shows didn’t seem to mind.

The celebrity hologram toured with a living backing group consisting, in large part, of former Dio bandmates.

A start-up called Eyellusion produced “Dio Returns.” It’s one of a handful of companies looking to mold and ultimately monetize a new, hybrid category of entertainment — part concert, part technology-driven spectacle — centered, thus far, on the holographic afterlives of deceased musical stars.

New tours are in the works for Roy Orbison, Frank Zappa, and Whitney Houston, pictured at the top of this article.

You can see an example of the technology on tour here: Dio returns video 

A celebrity hologram applied to marketing?

Sure this is cool (or maybe creepy … or both) but there are some fascinating implications for marketing. Couldn’t this be the ultimate in content creation? How does marketing take on new meaning when Elvis, Marilyn Monroe or another celebrity hologram shows up at your customer event or trade show booth?

The possibilities are limitless.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India has campaigned holographically, and a circus in Germany uses holographic projections of elephants and horses instead of live animals, and watch for a holographic dinosaur experience coming soon.

This is certainly worthy of a conversation, which is exactly what Brooke Sellas and I have on the new episode of The Marketing Companion.

In addition to hearing about our holographic insights, Brooke and I look at:

You won’t want to miss this holographic, spirited, soulful and detoxified show! Just click here:

Click here to dive into Episode 181

Other ways to enjoy our podcast

Please support our extraordinary sponsors. Our content is free because of their generosity.

Many thanks to our friend Scott Monty for the awesome show intro. Be sure to check out his introspective newsletter Timeless & Timely, where he covers the latest trends and the oldest principles.

Tim Washer is contributing creative direction to the show and he’s has worked for Conan O’Brien, John Oliver, among others. He helps corporations build more creative cultures.

 

If you’re a business owner or an entrepreneur, you know how hard it is to stay on top of all your contacts and ensure that nothing is falling through the cracks. Nimble is the simple, smart CRM that works directly within Office 365 and G Suite.

Nimble plugs into your email inbox and has a browser extension you can use on any website, including social media platforms and third-party apps. You’ll never have to leave the place you’re currently working on to access and update your existing contacts, as well as to create new contact records. Claim 30 percent off an annual license by going to nimble.com/companion and entering the promo code: COMPANION.

RSM Marketing provides an indispensable outsourced marketing department! Why struggle with turnover and staffing when RSM clients receive a marketing director and all the resources they need under a flat fee monthly subscription?

RSM employs dozens of specialists and experienced marketing directors who assist companies ranging from startups to market leaders with thousands of employees. Companies across the country from all categories are choosing this model to overcome marketing complexity and outpace their competition. The typical outsourcing client uses 11 RSM subject matter specialists but pays less than the cost of one of their own employees. RSM provides breakthrough marketing for clients and has been named twice to the INC 5000 list. Visit RSM for special Marketing Companion offers including $5,000 in free services.

The post Need new power for your content marketing? Add a celebrity hologram! appeared first on Schaefer Marketing Solutions: We Help Businesses {grow}.

Sleek raises $5M to help companies incorporate and operate in Singapore and Hong Kong

Sleek, a startup that is making it easier for other startups and companies to incorporate and operate in Singapore and Hong Kong, said today it has extended its seed financing round to raise $5 million.

The extended seed round for the two-year-old startup was led by private investors Pierre Lorinet and Fabio Blom, and MI8, an Asia-focused European backed private investment company.

Sleek also counts a number of high profile individuals including Martin Crawford, former Group CEO of corporate services giant Vistra, Olivier Gerhardt, founder of Wavecell, Eric Barbier, founder of TransferTo, and Olivier Legrand, MD Asia at Linkedin among its investors.

Sleek, founded by French entrepreneurs Julien Labruyere and Adrien Barthel, today helps more than 2,000 startups and companies in Singapore and Hong Kong, an additional market it extended to in mid-2019. Some of its clients include Yours Cosmetics (funded by Sequoia), Aspire Financials (which raised $30 million recently), Ematic Solutions, Devialet, and oil and gas giant Total.

As we wrote about them in June this year, Sleek not only helps startups and companies incorporate themselves in Singapore (and now, Hong Kong), but also takes care of their accounting, taxes, regulatory compliance and other administrative work.

Sleek founders Julien Labruyere (right) and Adrien Barthel (left)

Singapore and Hong Kong have emerged as epicenters for startups and tech worldwide. “Hong Kong is a historical Asian financial hub, with six times more operating companies than in Singapore and an amazing business ecosystem,” said Barthel, adding that despite the current situation in Hong Kong, the business is growing in the market.

Both Singapore and Hong Kong today offer a range of benefits including government-backed startup programs to attract businesses, but setting up shops there still require a lot of paperwork.

The traditional way of dealing with accounting and incorporation is a cumbersome task, and the last thing founders want to deal with, Barthel explained to TechCrunch in an interview. Plus, there’s no transparency in what the actual cost of doing these tasks would be, he said.

Sleek offers a subscription business, where it charges a fixed amount — about $600 — to its customers each year. Starting second year, it waives some of its fee, said Barthel. “We also offer a simple dashboard for our clients to quickly check the progress we have made on any front,” he added.

To make the deal even better, Sleek offers vouchers with subscription to AWS, Stripe, Google Cloud — that they are likely going to use in their businesses anyway — worth thousands of dollars. The startup also connects its partner entrepreneurs with financial institutions to help them access working capital.

Barthel said before signing up a client, Sleek does its own due diligence. “Singapore, for instance, has stringent on KYC (know your customer) processes. Among other things, we use a number of APIs that are tied with all the major global databases to ensure that our potential clients are not doing notorious business,” he said.

Sleek, which today employs 85 people, will use the fresh capital to expand its tech team, build new features for clients, and increase its operational capacity.

Is the idea of “brand” constant or evolving?

brand

I came across this charming ad from Coca-Cola. It’s from 1890. It’s obviously from another era, but the intent behind the brand is the same — Coke is trying to evoke an emotion of youthful vigor and sophistication … all at a good price.

Some things never change, but mostly they do. I’ve been thinking a lot about this lately. How has the idea of “brand” evolved over the decades?

What did “brand” mean in the 1800s? 1900s? The “Mad Man” days … versus what is happening now? Are some fundamentals of branding foundational and evergreen, or is the idea of “the brand” shifting toward something new?

I have some of my own ideas about this, but I polled some of my smart friends and they came through for me with some great perspectives. Let’s get into this fascinating debate.

Branding is more important than ever

I first started studying this question of brand evolution in 2014 as I was writing The Content Code. In this book I envisioned a new content marketing approach required by a world filled with far too much content. One conclusion: Branding in the modern world is more important than ever.

Content marketing today is a war for attention. If you already have some brand recognition, and maybe even an emotional response to a certain brand, you have an advantage in winning the war.

But how we gain that attention and sustain that meaningful emotion is changing dramatically, as my friends tell us:

Evelyn Starr, CEO and Founder E. Starr Associates

Branding is not the same today. There has been a huge shift in the idea of a brand, from a manufactured image to a collection of experiences. It is the reason companies are now focused on customer experience. The most forward-thinking companies realize that employee experience makes the customer experience. Progressive CEOs I have interviewed have literally said “my employees are 98% of our brand.”

In the past, companies could influence their brand image by tapping the dominant media of the time — TV, radio, print. But they were never really in control, which is why when social media came along things unraveled so fast.

Samantha Stone, Founder and CEO Marketing Advisory Network

The goal of a brand in the Mad Men era was to sell something. Today, our primary goal remains to sell something. However, the most durable brands also have a goal to stand for something — not only to their customers but for their team.

Carlos Oramas, CEO GEMS Group

The work of the Mad Men time aimed at having people aspire to belong to the brand, whereas today brands aim to belong to the people.

Chad Illa-Petersen, Founder Social Chadvisor

An old-school definition of brand: “a particular identity or image regarded as an asset.”

This is still the case. The identities, images that represent the “brand” may have changed, but “the brand” is still your biggest asset. Whether that’s is people, causes, quality, or a tiger on a cereal box, your brand is still the thing that makes you grrrreat

Shannah Haley, Director of Communications, City of Plano

Marketing still touches on the issue of creating attention (building awareness), but it’s much more about creating experiences (including the issues of FOMO and belonging) that lead to trust.

Gene Petrov, CEO Petrov LMC

The highest aim of a brand should be to serve people not necessarily sell. I think we are moving closer to that ideal, but it is obviously still a work in progress.

Jeff Thomas, President 30dps

Branding is still about being noticed and recognized, but it’s so much more about THEM (the customers) instead of US (the marketer). I still run into marketers who think that branding is all about self (who WE are as a company). While brands must be authentic (and transparent) to succeed, if the brand isn’t first and foremost about THEM, I believe they are ultimately doomed to failure.

Tyler Lessard, VP Marketing Vidyard

It feels like we’ve moved from a “one-dimensional” world of brand which was flat and static (Mad Men advertising, one way push), to a two-dimensional world of brand that is two-way and real-time (social media). We’re on the cusp of the “3D” brand where it’s a living organism. How it acts and behaves is just just as important as what it says.

Nir Betan, COO at StudeoHQ

The erosion of centralized control is one of the biggest paradigm shifts in branding today and is likely to only accelerate.

My own view

  • Many aspects of branding are the same … and always will be. The “Four Ps” are still solid – Place, Product, Promotion, and Price all matter, all communicate. I would add a fifth P in some cases – Purpose, which is quite different form the MadMen days.
  • Great branding requires that you connect some emotion to your product that compels a customer to buy.
  • Creating a long-lasting brand image — like Disney, Nike, or American Express — is important. But increasingly, branding is in-the-moment as consumers are always-on, always discovering, always reacting to the pulse of the culture. Example: Budweiser created a campaign in 12 hours based on a single strange event at a baseball game.
  • A brand used to be about changing a consumer. Today, it is more about respecting a consumer’s ability to make up their own mind and coming alongside them.
  • A brand used to be what we told you. Today, a brand is what consumers tell each other. Marketing today is about earning a place in that conversation. The customer is the marketer. How do we help them do that job?

What would you add?

Keynote speaker Mark SchaeferMark Schaefer is the chief blogger for this site, executive director of Schaefer Marketing Solutions, and the author of several best-selling digital marketing books. He is an acclaimed keynote speaker, college educator, and business consultant.  The Marketing Companion podcast is among the top business podcasts in the world. Contact Mark to have him speak to your company event or conference soon.

The post Is the idea of “brand” constant or evolving? appeared first on Schaefer Marketing Solutions: We Help Businesses {grow}.